Why this teen from a top Auckland school is helping the Pacific’s poorest

by King's College / 23 August, 2018
King’s College alumnus Max Lichtenstein.

King’s College alumnus Max Lichtenstein.

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A school trip led to King’s College alumnus Max Lichtenstein taking up environmental studies and starting Let Them Fish, a charity that helps our Pacific neighbours to fish.

It was his experience volunteering in the Pacific Islands that inspired Max Lichtenstein to enrol in a Bachelor of Environmental Policy and Planning at Lincoln University, with an additional major in Parks and Outdoor Recreation.

“After five years as a Sea Cadet, I was pretty certain I was going to join the Navy,” says Max. “Towards the end of my final year at school, I realised that as much as I love being at sea, a career in the military was not a decision I was ready to make at that time.

“While I was at King’s College I was lucky enough to join the Chapel Service trip to Tonga,” he says. “I saw first-hand how susceptible to environmental issues the Pacific region is – it inspired me to consider a course of study focusing on people and the environment.”

A recipient of Lincoln University’s Global Challenges Scholarship two years in a row and this year’s Department of Conservation Outdoor Recreation Scholarship, as well as a Southern Environmental Trust Scholarship, Max is setting his sights on a better future for New Zealand and our Pacific neighbourhood.

His drive to help vulnerable communities also spurred him to co-found Let Them Fish, a charity that collects used fishing and freediving equipment and sends it to impoverished coastal communities in the Pacific Islands.

King’s College offers students like Max exciting opportunities to develop their skills, interests and motivation, ultimately guiding them to make meaningful decisions about their future.

To find out more, visit kingscollege.school.nz

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