New leaks didn't come from National MP – Bridges

by RNZ / 04 December, 2018
simon bridges

National Party leader Simon Bridges "did not accept" a leak about the party's internal polls came from one of his own MPs. Photo/RNZ/Rebekah Parsons-King

RelatedArticlesModule - bridges

National Party leader Simon Bridges is refusing to discuss more leaks that appear to be coming from his own caucus.

RNZ and other media outlets received an anonymous text revealing details of internal polling presented to the caucus last week, from someone claiming to be a National MP.

The leaking of Mr Bridges' transport expenses back in August led to a major political controversy, with rogue MP Jami-Lee Ross leaking extensively against his leader.

Last week an anonymous message detailed internal polling showing the National Party on 41 percent and Labour on 44 percent.

That was not as flattering as a recent public poll and Mr Bridges refused to discuss it when speaking to reporters today.

"I'm not going to talk about internal polls, what we know is we've got a poll there that's public, that's 46 percent, that show's we've got momentum, you can understand there'll be speculation and rumours."

He was asked about the internal polling, putting his party 4 points lower at 41 percent.

"I don't talk about internal polls, it's a Labour Party trick."

Mr Bridges "did not accept" the leak came from one of his own MPs.

"I've made really clear, look you'd expect rumours and speculation, we've seen a huge amount of that from the Labour Party trying to push a variety of numbers we know just aren't there."

Jami-Lee Ross laid a complaint with the police about what he alleged was corrupt electoral practice by the National leader.

Mr Bridges has repeatedly denied any wrongdoing and said he had not yet been contacted by the police.

This article was first published on Radio NZ.

Latest

Fine lines: New Anzac books and graphic novels for kids
105028 2019-04-25 00:00:00Z Books

Fine lines: New Anzac books and graphic novels for…

by Ann Packer

A telegraph “boy”, heroic animals and even shell-shock make for engaging reads for children.

Read more
Keeping up appearances: The challenging job of restoring NZ's lighthouses
104978 2019-04-25 00:00:00Z Life in NZ

Keeping up appearances: The challenging job of res…

by Fiona Terry

Ensuring lighthouses stay “shipshape” isn’t a job for the faint-hearted.

Read more
The former major reuniting service medals with their rightful owners
105015 2019-04-25 00:00:00Z Life in NZ

The former major reuniting service medals with the…

by Fiona Terry

Service medals are being reunited with their rightful owners thanks to former major Ian Martyn and his determined research.

Read more
PM announces 'Christchurch Call' to end use of social media for terrorism
104952 2019-04-24 00:00:00Z Politics

PM announces 'Christchurch Call' to end use of soc…

by Noted

A meeting aims to see world leaders and CEOs of tech companies agree to a pledge called the ‘Christchurch Call’.

Read more
Red Joan: Judi Dench almost saves Soviet spy story from tedium
104942 2019-04-24 00:00:00Z Movies

Red Joan: Judi Dench almost saves Soviet spy story…

by James Robins

The fictionalised account of a British woman who spied for the Soviet Union is stiflingly quaint.

Read more
What to watch on TV this Anzac Day
104749 2019-04-24 00:00:00Z Television

What to watch on TV this Anzac Day

by Fiona Rae

Māori TV once again devotes the day to Anzac programming, including a live broadcast from Gallipoli.

Read more
Twist in the tale: Why Margaret Mahy changed the end of her classic debut
104490 2019-04-24 00:00:00Z Books

Twist in the tale: Why Margaret Mahy changed the e…

by Sally Blundell

The two different endings of the beloved A Lion in the Meadow still provoke debate. So which is better, the 1969 original or the later, kinder one?

Read more
Mapping the second brain: The latest science on the effect of your gut bacteria
104884 2019-04-24 00:00:00Z Health

Mapping the second brain: The latest science on th…

by Donna Chisholm

Most of us have heard the five-plus-a-day message for fruit and vegetables. But new research into gut health suggests that advice may need tweaking.

Read more