How Auckland's Mercury Lane will be transformed by the City Rail Link

by Vomle Springford / 08 March, 2018
All images by City Rail Link
Mercury Lane

How Mercury Lane could look by 2024. Photos/www.cityraillink.co.nz.

Changes ahead for Mercury Lane

As the City Rail Link takes shape, an iconic area of Auckland is set to get a new look

The City Rail Link team has released new concept images of the future Karangahape Station and Aotea Station that will be built as part of the $2.5 billion public transport project, and Mercury Lane looks dramatically different.

A towering entrance to the Karangahape Station (a provisional name) from Mercury Lane is designed to “provide a dramatic sense of relief” with a series of patterns that are revealed as people walk through the space. 

Left, the interior of the station. Right, the exterior.

Left, the interior of the station. Right, the exterior.

The design concept of the station is based on the branches of Kauri trees radiating out with the overall experience “one of rising from, and descent into, the earth”. It’s proposed that light and sound will be used to enhance the experience. All of the CRL's design is influenced by the Mana Whenua forum, a collaborative group made up of local iwi.

The much-loved Mercury Plaza food court, which is still operating, will eventually be demolished to make way for the station and possible high-density housing for 400 residents, with ground floor retail spaces. A demolition date for the food court has not been set, but it will not be within the next 12 months, a CRL spokesperson said.

A new laneway beside the station will also be created connecting Mercury Lane with East Street.

Pictured below is the current view of Mercury Lane, from the bottom of the lane – click the next image to see what it could potentially look like in 2024. The Mercury Theatre, a heritage building with a Baroque facade built in 1910, at the top of these images, will remain in place.

ArticleGalleryModule - Mercury Lane

The station is to be the deepest station on the new train line, at 30 metres underground. Meanwhile, construction of the tunnel for the train line is continuing downtown. By mid-2018, 100 metres of the tunnel will be built at the Commercial Bay site between Lower Queen and Albert St. It will join the tunnels coming down Albert St and Britomart Station.

Major work on the Karangahape Station is expected to start in a couple of years.

A view from Cross St towards the entrance of the station.

A view from Cross St towards the entrance of the station.

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