How an Auckland couple is tackling the disposable nappies problem

by North & South / 31 January, 2019
The disposable nappies of a child born today will still be intact long after that child has died of old age.

The disposable nappies of a child born today will still be intact long after that child has died of old age.

An Auckland couple tackles the disposable nappies problem.

We’ve started to get serious about the problem of single-use plastic bags, but what about disposable nappies? More than a million of them end up in our landfills every week.

Start-up Little & Brave Eco Nappies, founded by Auckland couple Tahlia and Semisi Hutchison, is tackling the challenge head-on with a new fully compostable nappy and a commercial composting service, the first of its kind in New Zealand. “For us, it’s about providing good options, so families have a choice,” says Tahlia. “With more sustainable options, a greater number of families can reduce their waste to landfill, and the impact of single-use plastic products on future generations.”

Read more: The small but mighty power of Auckland’s Eco Neighbourhoods

Customers can drop off soiled nappies for free at a dedicated composting facility, or have nappies collected from their home via a drop and collect service. The nappies are processed in a composting machine that not only pasteurises the nappies, but “recycles” them into nutrient-dense compost over a four-week period.

For now, it’s only available in Auckland, but the Hutchisons – who have three children and a background in corporate finance – are working alongside councils and community groups to expand the composting service nationwide.

This article was first published in the January 2019 issue of North & South.

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